• 'Twisted' waves could boost wi-fi
    10 replies, posted
[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/science-environment-17221490[/url]
So is this altering the phase of the transmission, so you can have multiple streams on the same frequency?
Awesome~!
its kinda nuts how everythings so physical but you don't think of it that way i can't explain it
[QUOTE=TheChantzGuy;34959284]its kinda nuts how everythings so physical but you don't think of it that way i can't explain it[/QUOTE] I cant visualize a radio wave at all. I know its a wave, but what the hell does it actually LOOK like?
[QUOTE=inconspicious;34960379]I cant visualize a radio wave at all. I know its a wave, but what the hell does it actually LOOK like?[/QUOTE] Radio waves and visible light are both types of [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_radiation]electromagnetic radiation[/url]. They can be represented as two perpendicular-on-axis transverse waves shifted half out of phase (pardon the informal definition) - a wave for electric field, and a wave for magnetic field. This radiation self-propagates - which is why EMR generally travels in a straight light through a continuous medium. (Of course, it can be reflected and refracted.) A [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_radiation]gif on Wikipedia[/url] of polarized EMR: [quote][img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Electromagneticwave3D.gif[/img][/quote] I still can't figure out what they mean by a "corkscrew" in the article, though...maybe it has to do with something similar to polarization and filtering out waves aligned differently. (And, yes, this "polarization" is the same kind of polarization in sunglasses). If this is, indeed, the case - I'd be surprised if it hasn't had (failed) attempts before - it would be one of those things people a hundred years in the future look back on, and say: "Well, of course it works like that!" Perhaps the problem stems from physics textbooks only showing graphs of [i]polarized[/i] EMR - no one ever really gave thought about discussing how to visualize un-polarized EMR (at least, to undergrads).
Does information encoded in these "twisted waves" stay legible over longer distances?
yeah but cancer
Somewhat related: [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elliptical_polarization]elliptical polarization[/url] is cool. [quote][img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6a/Elliptical_polarization_schematic.png[/img][/quote] Enjoy the next [url=http://xkcd.com/214/]three[/url] hours of Wikipedia surfing!
[QUOTE=Night-Eagle;34960770]Radio waves and visible light are both types of [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_radiation]electromagnetic radiation[/url]. They can be represented as two perpendicular-on-axis transverse waves shifted half out of phase (pardon the informal definition) - a wave for electric field, and a wave for magnetic field. This radiation self-propagates - which is why EMR generally travels in a straight light through a continuous medium. (Of course, it can be reflected and refracted.) A [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_radiation]gif on Wikipedia[/url] of polarized EMR: I still can't figure out what they mean by a "corkscrew" in the article, though...maybe it has to do with something similar to polarization and filtering out waves aligned differently. (And, yes, this "polarization" is the same kind of polarization in sunglasses). If this is, indeed, the case - I'd be surprised if it hasn't had (failed) attempts before - it would be one of those things people a hundred years in the future look back on, and say: "Well, of course it works like that!" Perhaps the problem stems from physics textbooks only showing graphs of [i]polarized[/i] EMR - no one ever really gave thought about discussing how to visualize un-polarized EMR (at least, to undergrads).[/QUOTE] So it is spatially like waves on the surface of water, and the wavelength + amplitude are real dimensions which the wave sits in?
[QUOTE=inconspicious;34961657]So it is spatially like waves on the surface of water, and the wavelength + amplitude are real dimensions which the wave sits in?[/QUOTE] That is a reasonable approximate way to view it. Now imagine that body of water suspended in the air moving forward, rotating around a central axis like a corkscrew (which is what the article alluded to). Intuitively, from the difficulty of attempting to visualize that, you can see how that could be used for additional bandwidth :v:
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